Hayato KONDO

Project Research Fellow

Research Interests

I specialize in Indian philosophy, focusing especially on the Yuktidīpikā, and working to elucidate the historical development of classical Sāṃkhya philosophy. In the field of library science, I explore the formulation of logical, user-friendly organization methods for Sanskrit materials from a technical perspective. I also work on the digitalization of Sanskrit manuscripts and methods for making these publically available.

CV

【Education】

2007  BA in Literature, School of Letters, Arts and Sciences I (Eastern Philosophy), Waseda University
2009  MA in Literature, Graduate School of Humanities and Sociology, Asian Culture (Indian Literature, Indian Philosophy, Buddhist Studies), The University of Tokyo
2017  Withdrawal from the doctoral program with the completion of course requirements, Graduate School of Humanities and Sociology, Asian Culture (Indian Literature, Indian Philosophy, Buddhist Studies), The University of Tokyo
2018  PhD in Literature, Graduate School of Humanities and Sociology, Asian Culture (Indian Literature, Indian Philosophy, Buddhist Studies), The University of Tokyo

【Academic Positions】

2009–2012 Japanese Society for the Promotion of Science DC1 Research Fellow
2016–present Part-time Lecturer, Nursing School of the Jikei, and others
2016–2017 Project Research Fellow, Department of Indian Philosophy and Buddhist Studies, School of Humanities and Sociology, The University of Tokyo
2017–present Part-time Researcher, International Education and Research Laboratory Program (Humanities and Social Sciences), University of Tsukuba
2018–present Project Research Fellow, Uehiro Project for the Asian Research Library

Articles & Presentation

– “Dual Implications Reflected in the Simile of a Two-Sided Mirror: Tracing the History of the Sāṃkhya Theory of Reflection.” Journal of Indian and Buddhist Studies (Japanese Association of Indian and Buddhist Studies) 66, no. 1 (December 2017): 485–480 (in Japanese).

– “Desperate Measures to Defend Satkāryavāda.” Studies in Indian Philosophy and Buddhism (Department of Indian Philosophy and Buddhist Studies, Graduate School of Humanities and Sociology, The University of Tokyo) 22 (Special Issue: Research on the Ontological Discussions in Various Schools of Indian Philosophy) (March 2015): 121–50 (in Japanese).

– “Reinterpretation of Tradition and Transmission: Āptavacana in the Yuktidīpikā.” Journal of Indological Studies (Association for the Study of the History of Indian Thought) 24/25 (March 2014): 137–68.

“Refutation of the Non-distinction between Inference and Verbal Testimony in the Yuktidīpikā.” Journal of Buddhist Studies (Association of Buddhist Philosophy) 53 (December 2011): 65–91 (in Japanese).

– “Perception Theories of the *Ṣaṣṭitantravr̥tti in the Pramāṇasamuccayaṭīkā (Chapter 1): In Relation to the Yuktidīpikā.Studies in Indian Philosophy and Buddhism (Department of Indian Philosophy and Buddhist Studies, Graduate School of Humanities and Sociology, The University of Tokyo) 17 (March 2010): 25–40 (in Japanese).

– “A Two-Sided Mirror Reflecting Tracing the History of the Sāṃkhya Theory of Reflection.” The Tsukuba–Hamburg Universities Symposium Series: Buddhist Studies Young Scholars’ Workshop, January 22, 2018 (Raum 117 in Alsterterrasse, Asien-Afrika-Institut, Universität Hamburg).