Yuki SHIBUYA

Project Research Fellow

Research Interests

・The history of Ho Chi Minh City (from the first half of the 19th century until the present)
・Transformation of rural society as a result of industrialization in southern Vietnam

CV

【Education】

2003 B.A. Oriental History, Faculty of Letters, The University of Tokyo
2004–2006 Department of Vietnamese Studies and Vietnamese Language for Foreigners, University of Social Sciences and Humanities, Vietnam National University – Ho Chi Minh City
2007 M.A. South and Southeast Asian History and Society, Graduate School of Humanities and Sociology, The University of Tokyo
2013 Withdrawal from the doctoral program with the completion of course requirements, Graduate School of Humanities and Sociology, The University of Tokyo

【Academic Positions】

2008–2010 JSPS Research Fellow (DC2), The University of Tokyo
2014–Present Project Research Fellow, Uehiro Project for the Asian Research Library

Articles & Presentations

“The Transformative Influence of Industrialization on the Rural Economy in South Vietnam, 1945-2009: The Case of Phu An Village, Ben Cat Prefecture, Binh Duong Province,” in Workshop Proceedings, Scientific basis for regional development in the context of international integration of Vietnam, Hanoi: Vietnam National University – Hanoi, 2009: 376–387 (in Vietnamese).

“The Labor Situation in Dong Nai Industrial Zones during Vietnam’s Integration into the Global Economy,” in Misaki IWAI and Bùi Thế Cường (eds.), Workshop Proceedings, Population Movements in the Period of Modernization and Industrialization in Vietnam, Hà Nội : Nha xuat ban Khoa Hoc Xa Hoi, 2010: 176–196 (in Vietnamese).

“Southeast Asia,” Shigaku zasshi, 177–5 (2008): 271–276 (in Japanese).

“The transformation of rural suburbs through France’s construction of Saigon City: The Cong Dien in Cau Kho district,” Japan Society for Vietnamese Studies, The University of Tokyo, May 10, 2014.

“Colonial urbanization on the periphery of Saigon City from the mid-19th century to the early 20th century,” Oriental History Session, the 111th Annual Meeting of the Historical Society of Japan, The University of Tokyo, November 10, 2013.

 

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